Who we are

We are an independent opticians located in the centre of Weybridge since 1992. As Optometrists with over 25 years of experience we are delighted to be able to share our passion about vision with you all.

Ensuring that our patients are given the best service possible is our priority. Here at Henning & Henning we offer a friendly, personal service to all.

Services we offer

Our screening using state-of-the-art optical equipment such as the OCT and MPOD, is another area that we believe can benefit our Patients. The advancement of technology has allowed extensive progress in all areas of eyecare. These advancements range from Spectacle frames , lenses and coatings through to contact lenses and dry eye management.

Our extensive range of spectacle frames encompasses collections that are fashion forward, ultra lightweight, petite, rimless, traditional, bespoke and designer.

We offer eye tests, contact lens consultation and specialist services for persons of all ages.

Finding us

We are located on Church Street, in Weybridge town centre.

The nearest parking is Churchfields car park, behind the library.

We offer access for the disabled

Blind Veterans UK

Living so close to London, I’m sure most of us have had a chance to view artist Paul Cummins’ magnificent 888,246 hand-made ceramic poppy installation, either in it’s entirety or at some stage during it’s residency at the Tower of London.

Although each of these poppies represent the death of a British or Commonwealth soldier during the First World War, it is hard not to think about those lost in numerous subsequent conflicts involving British soldiers that have broken out around the world since.

Blind Veterans UK is a charity devoted to supporting blind and visually impaired veterans. This charity wishes to increase people’s awareness of its work in a bid to reach more of the estimated 68,000 blind veterans who could be eligible for ‘free and lifelong support.’

http://www.noonealone.org.uk/

 

 

WHO warns of lasting vision problems in Ebola survivors

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The world is just about getting to grips with the horrific crisis that the recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has caused. A recent update from the World Health Organization (WHO) is warning of lasting damage to the sight of patients who have survived the infection.

At the first Ebola survivors conference in Kenema, Sierra Leone, health workers from WHO met with a growing population of people who have survived the deadly virus.

Organised by humanitarian agencies UNCIEF and GOAL, the conference has been set up to identify the psychological, social and economic needs of survivors in the country. Sierra Leone has the highest number of laboratory confirmed cases of infection and the virus has killed more than 2,400 people since the outbreak began in March.

“We are seeing a lot of people with vision problems,” said Dr Margaret Nanyonga, a psychosocial support officer for WHO in Kenema. “Some complain of clouded vision, but for others the visual loss is progressive. I have seen two people who are now blind.”

According to the health workers, vision problems have been seen in up to half of survivors, with other symptoms including bodily aches, headaches and extreme fatigue, and is termed by Dr Nanyona as ‘post-Ebola syndrome’.

While poverty and poor nutrition are prevalent in Sierra Leone, the lasting effects of infection may be compounding existing health problems, making it more difficult to return to their former working lives.

Dr Nanyonga added: “We need to understand why these symptoms persist, whether they are caused by the disease or treatment, or perhaps the heavy disinfection.”

Dr Andrew Ramsay, a field coordinator for WHO in Kenema, said: “Eye problems might be caused by damage to the cornea, to the nerves or something else. At this point we do not have enough information to know exactly what is going on. But we need to find out urgently so we can do whatever we can to preserve the eyesight for people who have to try to pick up their lives again.”

 

 

 

 

It’s not just the autumn leaves that are changing colour.

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The ability to change clothing according to mood and occasion has led to the existence of a substantial fashion industry with a large following.

Colour contact lenses enable people to extend this flexibility of appearance to their eyes. This makes it possible to use lens colours that complement an outfit, or create a natural enhancement to the eyes’ appearance.

The new Air Optix Colors lenses use innovative technology to deliver comfort, breathability and beauty.

The design features a unique plasma surface technology that smooths and protects the lens to retain moisture and resist deposits.

Air Optix Colors are available in nine natural-looking colours; five subtle and four vibrant.

They are suitable for both prescription and non-prescription wearers.

Why not pop in to find out which colour would suit you best,